Equality

News items tagged as Equality relate to treatment received by Canadian organizations, individuals and institutions by the federal government.

Canada Without Poverty Launches Charter Challenge to Restrictions on Charities

Canada Without Poverty

On Sept. 6, 2016, Canada Without Poverty, a registered charity that works towards the relief of poverty in Canada, announced is has filed a charter challenge against regulations that limit charities' abilities to carry out political activities.

Defending Rights for All: Amnesty International’s Human Rights Agenda for a new Canadian Government

Amnesty International Canada, 10 December 2015

The change in government following the October 2015 federal election must now become the catalyst for a new approach and strengthened commitment to improving Canada’s domestic and international human rights record, Amnesty International said with the release of its 2016 Human Rights Agenda for Canada: Defending Rights for All today, International Human Rights Day.

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women: Multiple Remedies Required from Ottawa and Other Governments

By Veronica Strong-Boag, 8 Dec. 2015

The new Liberal government has now announced that the inquiry will begin, at the latest, by June of 2016. Pre-inquiry consultations will determine its scope and mandate, and proponents of justice for Indigenous women are urging the federal government to avoid the many mistakes of the Oppal Inquiry in BC.

Human Rights: What the new Government of Canada must do

December 10, 2015—Between 2010 and 2015, Voices-Voix documented attacks on human rights by previous Canadian governments on Canadian rights defenders, NGOs and other civil society organizations. Elected on October 19 with a majority, the new federal government has a critical opportunity to reengage with constitutional protections and see through numerous campaign commitments.

After ten years of abuse, Canadian democracy needs an overhaul

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

By Voices-Voix, iPolitics.ca, 24 November 2015

For a generation of young and new Canadians, their only experience of government is that of the past ten years. Simply reversing the worst of the Harper record isn’t enough

The Harper Record 2008 - 2015

This book, which builds on the 2008 collection The Harper Record, continues a 25-year tradition at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives of periodically examining the records of Canadian federal governments during their tenure. As with earlier CCPA reports on the activities of the Mulroney, Chrétien and Martin governments while in office, this book gives a detailed account of the laws, policies, regulations, and initiatives of the Conservative government of Prime Minister Stephen Harper while in minority (from 2008 to 2011) and majority (from 2011 to 2015).

The 36 writers, researchers and analysts who have co-written this book probe into many aspects of the Harper government’s administration over the last two parliamentary sessions. From the economy to the environment, social programs to foreign policy, health care to tax cuts, the tar sands to free trade deals, and many other areas, these chapters dig through the facts and key moments for this government over the past seven years, highlighting in particular its policy response to the global financial crisis and Great Recession.

Factsheet: Comparing Treatment Of Business & Associations (General Assembly Report – Oct. 2015)

United Nations Special Rapporteur

The Special Rapporteur’s factsheet summarizing his “sectoral equity” report, which examines differential treatment of businesses and associations.

The report, which is scheduled to be presented in late October 2015, is a comparative study of enabling environments for associations and businesses, examining how and why States treat each sector differently. The Special Rapporteur asserts that businesses generally operate in better environments, largely because States, multilateral organizations and other key actors make great efforts to create such environments, whereas those actors often make comparatively little effort to improve the environment for associations.

A haven no more: Canada's conservative refugee policy

By Al Jazeera, 15 September 2015

Nabil Hawara spent 20 years as a political prisoner in Syria before fleeing the war-torn country with his family as refugees in 2013 in the hope of reaching Canada - and the promise of a brighter future.

Two-and-a-half years later, he's still waiting on bureaucratic red-tape that would reunite him with his wife and children in Montreal.

Canadian immigration rules wouldn't allow Hawara to bring his family along from Turkey after he applied for refugee status, and he now spends his days eager for updates from the government, which hasn't provided a reason why they're not with him.

Canada Must Welcome Refugees

By Canadian Association of Muslim Women in Law, 10 September 2015

In 2014, there were 19.5 million refugees in the world, with an average of 42,500 people forced every day to migrate due to conflict and persecution. Only about 10% of these refugees were hosted by countries in the West. This year, approximately 3,270 refugees have already died on their journeys to safety.

In under a decade, the Canadian government has implemented 111 new immigration policies without parliamentary approval — compared to 19 in the preceding century and a half.

Accordingly, the Canadian Association of Muslim Women in Law (CAMWL) stands in solidarity with community and advocacy groups across the country in calling on the Canadian government to welcome refugees.

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